Ferrari: A Man and His Vision

Enzo Ferrari was a race-car driver for Alfa Roméo. He stopped racing following the birth of the first of his two sons. Known as Dino, his elder son Alfredo was a mechanical engineer who died of muscular dystrophy at the age of 24. In 1956, the year of his death, he designed, with collaboration of Pinin Farina, the first Ferrari V6 rear-drive sports car. This type of engine had already been used in race cars, but never in a sports car.

When Dino presented the engine to his father that year, the latter did not allow it to be stamped with the Ferrari logo because it was only six cylinders. Since Enzo had always favoured engine power over aerodynamics, as far as he was concerned, a Ferrari had to have a 12-cylinder engine. The first car to bear the Dino marque was introduced in 1967.

Ferrari Dino 1967
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Ferrari 296 GTB

On June 24, 2021, Ferrari unveiled its brand-new plug-in hybrid model, the 296 GTB. Although it isn’t Ferrari’s first hybrid, it is a big step towards a fully electric car. This somewhat surprising composite features an ecological 6-cylinder engine along with the high performance one expects from a Ferrari. In a stroke of genius, the Italian company has taken inspiration from the original Dino and revived the V6 engine, combining environmental sustainability with the performance of a V12. One thing is certain: while the new car’s look takes its cue from the 1960s, referencing the Dino and the 250 LM, its design is infused with the Ferrari DNA.

It is a tribute to Enzo and his son Dino, the trailblazer. Both would surely be very proud!

I can’t say for certain that, even if I had tried my hardest, I would have become a great racing driver. Back then, I already had my doubts—doubts that were well founded because I knew that I possessed a fatal flaw: when I drove, I respected my car. If you really want to win races, you have to mistreat your vehicle. In other words, shift gears even when unnecessary, exceed the maximum engine speed, and brake with impunity: all of which run contrary to my idea of a race car. I drive for the sensation. And I need to feel all the reactions of the car—it makes me feel good—to be in sync with it. In short, I wasn’t capable of making a car suffer. This love for cars, which took on a sensual and almost sexual form in my subconscious, no doubt explains why it has been years since I have gone to watch my cars race. Designing them, seeing them be created, and then seeing them die—because during a race, they always die, even when they win—was too emotional for me.

Enzo Ferrari

Mr. Enzo Ferrari’s Portrait: Illustration Louis C. Hébert 

ferrariquebec.com

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