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Pride of place

Dom Perignon

BUILT WITH MATERIALS TAKEN FROM THE LAND ON WHICH IT STANDS, THIS SECOND HOME IS A TESTAMENT TO TRANQUILITY.

The owner was smitten by the setting: “It was a former lumber camp, and I just loved the wooded lot,” he says. “We put a great deal of thought into the design and landscaping.” The result is a perfect symbiosis. Everything was conceived and executed with an awareness of the existing environment—indoors and out—and most of the construction materials come from the land itself, helping create a sense of peaceful harmony between the house and its natural surroundings.

The huge deck, for example, follows the contours of the land, as do the curved steps off the deck in front of the turret. The turret itself is part of an extension that was added to the old house, which was originally built around 1900. Thanks to the use of identical materials, it is impossible to tell that the two buildings were constructed so far apart. The repurposed lumber used for the deck roof and railings, and the rough-hewn logs that support the roof add untold charm to this beautiful home.

    Galerie Beauchamp

«I LIKE TO BUY FROM ANTIQUE DEALERS IN CANADA AND THE U.S. IN THIS HOME, I WANTED TO USE FOLK ART COLLECTIBLES PRIMARILY BY QUEBEC ARTISTS.»

The old home’s structure was left unchanged, where most of the walls still feature the original logs, and the dining room is a prime example. Aside from using local materials, another big priority for the owners was maintaining the antique character of the interior. They chose rustic furniture, and found a fixture made of antlers at an antique dealer. The original living room is also intact, with a majestic wood-burning fireplace surrounded by a huge surround of stone sourced from the property. Simple, cozy armchairs arranged on a Persian rug complete the homey, comfortable feel of the room. In the child’s room, also in the old wing of the house, natural pine planks achieve a similar effect.

The dividers and walls in the new wing are also made of wood—the unifying material connecting old and new. But here, the wood is painted white, adding a fresh, bright touch. The immaculate kitchen has New England-style cabinetry, while the furniture in the eating area, the big chopping block, and the dark wood mantlepiece serve as a common thread between the two wings.

You won’t find a single sheet of drywall in this house: even the ceilings are clad entirely in wood, guaranteeing warmth and texture, whatever the colour. The majestic cathedral ceiling in the stairwell is evidence of this, its curved lines creating softness in this vast space.

It is absolutely possible to imagine and build remarkably beautiful and charming homes when one knows how to make good use of the riches that surround us.


Pride of place – e-mag

Ofelia